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Ivy League professor says her students think most Americans earn six figures

PHILADELPHIA - A professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania — regarded as one of the most prestigious business schools in the nation — asked her students how much they believed the average U.S. worker earned per year.Their answers were laughable to say the least. "25% of them thought it was over six figures. One of them thought it was $800k.

Really not sure what to make of this," wrote Nina Strohminger, a professor of legal studies and business ethics on Twitter.Her tweet quickly went viral causing many to roast her students. The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. "Don't you think business students at Wharton should have to do one of those simulations where they have to live like people on 45k for a week? A reality show? That's my pitch. You can take it, if you want," wrote one user."This is why the wealth gap is so toxic to our society.

The rich literally have no concept of how anyone actually lives. And most people I've met do not make even 45k a year," wrote another. Americans’ overall income has accelerated since the pandemic, but so has inflation — and a new poll finds that far more people are noticing the higher prices than the pay gains.Two-thirds say their household costs have risen since the pandemic, compared with only about a quarter who say their incomes have increased, according to a poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Half say their incomes have stayed the same.

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PHILADELPHIA - A professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania — regarded as one of the most prestigious business schools in the nation — asked her students how much they believed the average U.S. worker earned per year.Their answers were laughable to say the least. "25% of them thought it was over six figures. One of them thought it was $800k.
The three Covid symptoms first identified at the start of the pandemic are less common, according to one Covid expert.

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A pandemic is a disease epidemic that has spread across a large region, for instance multiple continents, or worldwide. A widespread endemic disease with a stable number of infected people is not a pandemic. Further, flu pandemics generally exclude recurrences of seasonal flu. Throughout history, there have been a number of pandemics of diseases such as smallpox and tuberculosis. One of the most devastating pandemics was the Black Death, which killed an estimated 75–200 million people in the 14th century.